Jane Fonda: I have never done anything to hurt my country

Jane Fonda’s scheduled appearance on QVC to promote her book has been cancelled. In her own words, she explains why:

I was to have been on QVC today to introduce my book, “Prime Time,” about aging and the life cycle. The network said they got a lot of calls yesterday criticizing me for my opposition to the Vietnam War and threatening to boycott the show if I was allowed to appear. I am, to say the least, deeply disappointed that QVC caved to this kind of insane pressure by some well funded and organized political extremist groups. And that they did it without talking to me first. I have never shied away from talking about this as I have nothing to hide. I could have pointed out that threats of boycotts are nothing new for me and have never prevented me from having best selling books and exercise DVDs, films, and a Broadway play. Most people don’t buy into the far right lies. Many people have reached out to express how excited they were about my going onto QVC and hearing about my book.
Bottom line, this has gone on far too long, this spreading of lies about me! None of it is true. NONE OF IT! I love my country. I have never done anything to hurt my country or the men and women who have fought and continue to fight for us. I do not understand what the far right stands to gain by continuing with these myths. In this case, they denied a lot of people the chance to hear about a book that can help make life better, easier and more fulfilling. I am deeply grateful for all of the support I have been getting since this happened, including from my Vietnam Veterans friends.

Here are photos of Jane Fonda “loving” her country and the men and women who fought for it.

Jane Fonda in North Vietnam anti-aircraft batteryJane Fonda in North Korea

Here is the transcript of a radio broadcast Jane Fonda made from Hanoi on August 22, 1972, while North Vietnamese were fighting American troops:

This is Jane Fonda. During my two week visit in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, I’ve had the opportunity to visit a great many places and speak to a large number of people from all walks of life- workers, peasants, students, artists and dancers, historians, journalists, film actresses, soldiers, militia girls, members of the women’s union, writers.
I visited the (Dam Xuac) agricultural coop, where the silk worms are also raised and thread is made. I visited a textile factory, a kindergarten in Hanoi. The beautiful Temple of Literature was where I saw traditional dances and heard songs of resistance. I also saw unforgettable ballet about the guerrillas training bees in the south to attack enemy soldiers. The bees were danced by women, and they did their job well.
In the shadow of the Temple of Literature I saw Vietnamese actors and actresses perform the second act of Arthur Miller’s play All My Sons, and this was very moving to me- the fact that artists here are translating and performing American plays while US imperialists are bombing their country.
I cherish the memory of the blushing militia girls on the roof of their factory, encouraging one of their sisters as she sang a song praising the blue sky of Vietnam- these women, who are so gentle and poetic, whose voices are so beautiful, but who, when American planes are bombing their city, become such good fighters.
I cherish the way a farmer evacuated from Hanoi, without hesitation, offered me, an American, their best individual bomb shelter while US bombs fell near by. The daughter and I, in fact, shared the shelter wrapped in each others arms, cheek against cheek. It was on the road back from Nam Dinh, where I had witnessed the systematic destruction of civilian targets- schools, hospitals, pagodas, the factories, houses, and the dike system.
As I left the United States two weeks ago, Nixon was again telling the American people that he was winding down the war, but in the rubble- strewn streets of Nam Dinh, his words echoed with sinister (words indistinct) of a true killer. And like the young Vietnamese woman I held in my arms clinging to me tightly- and I pressed my cheek against hers- I thought, this is a war against Vietnam perhaps, but the tragedy is America’s.
One thing that I have learned beyond a shadow of a doubt since I’ve been in this country is that Nixon will never be able to break the spirit of these people; he’ll never be able to turn Vietnam, north and south, into a neo- colony of the United States by bombing, by invading, by attacking in any way. One has only to go into the countryside and listen to the peasants describe the lives they led before the revolution to understand why every bomb that is dropped only strengthens their determination to resist. I’ve spoken to many peasants who talked about the days when their parents had to sell themselves to landlords as virtually slaves, when there were very few schools and much illiteracy, inadequate medical care, when they were not masters of their own lives.
But now, despite the bombs, despite the crimes being created- being committed against them by Richard Nixon, these people own their own land, build their own schools- the children learning, literacy- illiteracy is being wiped out, there is no more prostitution as there was during the time when this was a French colony. In other words, the people have taken power into their own hands, and they are controlling their own lives.
And after 4,000 years of struggling against nature and foreign invaders- and the last 25 years, prior to the revolution, of struggling against French colonialism- I don’t think that the people of Vietnam are about to compromise in any way, shape or form about the freedom and independence of their country, and I think Richard Nixon would do well to read Vietnamese history, particularly their poetry, and particularly the poetry written by Ho Chi Minh.

Her visit to North Vietnam should not be treated lightly as just a publicity stunt: It had real life consequences to the War and the people who fought in it:

In 1972 Jane Fonda, Tom Hayden and others traveled to North Vietnam to give their support to the North Vietnamese’s Government.  When she returned to the United States, she advised the news media that all of the American Prisoners of War were being well treated and were not being tortured.
As the American POWs returned home in 1973, they spoke out about the inhumane treatment and torture they had suffered as prisoners of war.  Their stories directly contradicted Jane Fonda’s earlier statements of 1972.   Some of the American POWs such as Senator John McCain, a former Presidential candidate, stated that he was tortured by his guards for refusing to meet with Jane Fonda and her group.  Jane Fonda, in her response to these new allegations, referred to the returning POWs as being “hypocrites and liars.”
The Wall Street Journal (August 3, 1995) published an interview with Bui Tin who served on the General Staff of the North Vietnam Army and received the unconditional surrender of South Vietnam on April 30, 1975.  During the interview  Mr. Tin was asked if the American antiwar movement was important to Hanoi’s victory.  Mr. Tin responded “It was essential to our strategy”  referring to the war being fought on two fronts, the Vietnam battlefield and back home in America through the antiwar movement on college campuses and in the city streets.  He further stated the North Vietnamese leadership listened to the American evening news broadcasts “to follow the growth of the American antiwar movement.”

The US Constitution’s definition of treason–”giving aid and comfort to the enemy”–is construed to mean physical aid and comfort. This is why Jane Fonda was never charged with this crime. However, in any other country or culture, and by the common meaning of the word “treason”, Jane Fonda’s activities were treasonous.

Tokyo Rose spent some years in prison for just such activities during World War 2, even though she was under intense coercion. Lord Haw-Haw volunteered to go to Nazi Germany and make radio broadcasts against the British. For that he was hung. As for the poet Ezra Pound, he was able to escape the hangman’s noose after World War 2 only by being declared insane. Jane Fonda stands in their company.

Fonda should shut up, accept these rather mild consequences of her actions, and stop feigning innocence. It is unbecoming for an elderly woman to whine.

(H/t Gateway Pundit)

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6 Responses to Jane Fonda: I have never done anything to hurt my country

  1. loopyloo305 says:

    The trouble with some people is that they truly believe what they shovel! There is a God, I will not judge her but the time will come when she will have to answer questions that the Almighty will ask!

  2. I have never nor will I ever buy whatever Jane Fonda is selling.

    • John Scotus says:

      This is why QVC dumped her, I think. Not enough people willing to buy her junk. The sales of her latest book must be off, or she wouldn’t be complaining.

  3. Don E. Chute says:

    “Prime Time,” about aging and the life cycle.”

    I wonder if there’s a chapter in their about dementia? I’ll never know because I’m not buying it.

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